the accidental art student

fueled by coffee, fictions and self-deprecation

"There has always been violence in art. There is violence in the Bible, violence in Homer, violence in Shakespeare…The simplistic notion that films and TV can transform an otherwise innocent and good person into a criminal has strong overtones of the Salem witch trials.” -Stanley Kubrick (x)

(Source: davidfincherings, via mrmarselluswallace)

liamdryden:

hermionejg:

asammyg:

vicmorrowsghost:

fwips:

Chris Pratt Interrupts Interview To French Braid Intern’s Hair

Im fuckin furious 

I’m reblogging this because I know it’s going to destroy some of you. :P

OH. My God. GTFO of here. 

SERIOUSLY WTF

three instances of this gifset were on my dash at once, each with different infuriated reblogs below it

but I agree siR YOU MUST STOP

(Source: chrisprattdelicious)

97. Boyhood (2014), dir. Richard Linklater
In truth, it’s the story that happens off-screen that seems the most tantalizing. A real boy, undergoing the drama, tensions, joys and melancholy of growing up alongside his fictional counterpart, all the way molding and shaping what we would eventually see on screen. It is the truth of Ellar’s experience that bolsters the truth of what is captured of Mason’s, a truth that is then once again reflected and strengthened by the viewer’s own experiences. The film is not “life with the boring parts cut out”, because what life consists largely of the in-between. Milestones don’t become milestones until we’ve lived long past them and look back. You leave this film reflecting on the moments, experiences, reality and expectations, time and change. You remember what it felt like for the world to be so big, grow smaller before your eyes, then big again.

97. Boyhood (2014), dir. Richard Linklater

In truth, it’s the story that happens off-screen that seems the most tantalizing. A real boy, undergoing the drama, tensions, joys and melancholy of growing up alongside his fictional counterpart, all the way molding and shaping what we would eventually see on screen. It is the truth of Ellar’s experience that bolsters the truth of what is captured of Mason’s, a truth that is then once again reflected and strengthened by the viewer’s own experiences. The film is not “life with the boring parts cut out”, because what life consists largely of the in-between. Milestones don’t become milestones until we’ve lived long past them and look back. You leave this film reflecting on the moments, experiences, reality and expectations, time and change. You remember what it felt like for the world to be so big, grow smaller before your eyes, then big again.


During the jail cell scene in Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master where Joaquin Phoenix’s Freddie Quell unleashes a fit of rage, Phoenix actually breaks a real toilet. His actions were entirely improvised. Due to the historical past of the building where the scene took place, the toilet was also considered “historical”. Phoenix had no intentions to break the toilet, nor did he think it was possible (x).

During the jail cell scene in Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master where Joaquin Phoenix’s Freddie Quell unleashes a fit of rage, Phoenix actually breaks a real toilet. His actions were entirely improvised. Due to the historical past of the building where the scene took place, the toilet was also considered “historical”. Phoenix had no intentions to break the toilet, nor did he think it was possible (x).

(Source: thefilmfatale)

tarkovskologist:

"What do you want from me? What have I done? I’m just a word processor, for chrissake!"

After Hours (1985), Martin Scorsese

"Boyhood" makes us feel euphoric about movies, about their mystery, their power, their ability to move us to laughter and tears. It’s an unassuming masterpiece. Peter Travers (via oldfilmsflicker)

(via oldfilmsflicker)